Scientists make singleatom memory from copper and chlorine

Scientists make singleatom memory from copper and chlorine

first_imgIn 1960, U.S. physicist Richard Feynman famously predicted the coming age of nanotechnology in an essay entitled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom.” Nowhere has this idea proven more powerful than in the realm of data storage, where by continually shrinking the size of bits of data, today’s computer hard disk drives now pack 10,000 times more information than those from just 15 years ago. Now, that march to the bottom may finally be nearing its end. In today’s issue of Nature Nanotechnology researchers report using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to store data at the atomic scale. To do so, they evaporated chlorine atoms atop a copper surface, which assembled themselves into a gridlike pattern with a small number of empty spots. The researchers then used the STM to move individual chlorine atoms around, encoding a series of 0s and 1s into a 12×12 array of rectangular blocks. By precisely controlling the dark spots—places missing a chlorine atom—the team encoded 160 words from Feynman’s “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom” lecture, among other writings. Although the process of reading and writing data with an STM remains too slow to make a useful data storage technology, it shows it’s possible to store as much as 500 terabits—or 62.5 terabytes—of data per 6.5 square centimeters, another 500 times better than today’s hard disk technology.last_img read more

Weather forecasting bill clears Senate hurdle

Weather forecasting bill clears Senate hurdle

first_img Email That study was dropped in the revised bill, which now goes to the House of Representatives—where leaders have signaled their approval—for an expected vote next week. It will then go on to President Donald Trump for signing; observers predict the administration will support the bipartisan bill.The bill contains a few new provisions. It requires NOAA to secure a fourth airplane to back up its three “Hurricane Hunters”: two turboprops and a Gulfstream jet the agency uses to monitor hurricanes. The turboprops fly through storms, and the Gulfstream monitors them from above. Last year, the jet was grounded because of corrosion from Hurricane Hermine, and NOAA scrambled to find a replacement: a loaner from the U.S. National Science Foundation.The bill also mandates a study of where gaps may exist in NOAA’s weather radar network. Senator Richard Burr (R–NC), who has long advocated for a dedicated radar facility in Charlotte, sought the provision.Besides these additions, the bill largely follows its predecessor. The first significant legislation to address weather in a generation, it calls for NOAA to improve its hurricane and tornado research. It directs the agency to put sensors on subsea telecommunication cables to improve tsunami warnings, and expand its efforts in uncovering prehistoric tsunamis. It also orders the agency to evaluate how well the public understands and responds to its cryptic system of “watch” and “warning” weather alerts.The bill offers a sharp response to NOAA’s notoriously delayed and overbudget satellite missions, to the point of telling the agency which simulations it should run to judge the relative merits of sensors. It also requires NOAA to shift from relying exclusively on its own satellites and weather data and to look for commercial alternatives. 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Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Paul VoosenMar. 30, 2017 , 4:15 PM Creative Commons Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Weather forecasting bill clears Senate hurdle Better late than never, the U.S. Senate approved a bill yesterday that aims to bolster the capacity of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to make seasonal weather predictions between 2 weeks and 2 years out.“From long-term forecasting that can prevent costly agricultural losses to more actionable information about severe weather, this legislation will help save lives and reduce avoidable property loss,” Senator John Thune (R–SD), one of the bill’s primary sponsors, said after the vote, which passed by unanimous consent.Congress last year killed a previous version of the bill over a controversial study of a contested river basin in the Southeast that the bill would have mandated.last_img read more

Are you lying about your identity Artificial intelligence can tell by how

Are you lying about your identity Artificial intelligence can tell by how

first_img By Matthew HutsonJun. 9, 2017 , 3:30 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) DeanDrobot/iStock Photo Every year, millions of people have their identities stolen. There’s no foolproof way to pinpoint fakers, but thanks to Italian researchers, investigators may soon have another tool at their disposal—a way to suss out frauds and other liars online with just a few clicks of a mouse.Traditional methods of lie detection include face-to-face interviews and polygraphs that measure heart rate and skin conductance. But they can’t be done remotely, or with large numbers of people. Researchers have come up with effective computer-based tests that measure reaction time in response to true and false personal information. For the tests to work, though, experimenters have to know the truth in advance.To get around this obstacle, a team of Italian researchers has come up with an innovative way of figuring out the truth. They asked 20 volunteers to memorize the details of a fake identity and assume it as their own. The subjects then answered a set of yes-or-no questions using a computer, as did 20 truth-telling volunteers. Questions included things like: “Is Giulia your name?” and “Were you born in 1995?” Researchers recorded each answer and measured how the subjects’ mouse cursors moved, from the bottom middle of the screen to “yes” and “no” buttons in the top two corners. By tracking cursor movement, lie detection becomes a game of cat and mouse. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Are you lying about your identity? Artificial intelligence can tell by how you use your mouse Because liars can get to be as good as the rest of us at telling the truth, the researchers threw a wrench into their experiment. In addition to the 12 expected questions, they asked 12 unexpected questions based on the volunteers’ new identities. For example, they asked about a person’s zodiac sign, based on their birth date. And they asked about the capital city of the subject’s presumed region. A fraud might have memorized a fake birthday, but not known the corresponding zodiac sign, or been able to calculate it quickly enough. “We’ve found that if people rehearse lies, lying can be as easy as telling the truth,” says Bruno Verschuere, a forensic psychologist at the University of Amsterdam who was not involved in the research, “except when you ask unexpected questions.”The experimenters trained a computer to sort liars from truth tellers using the number of incorrect answers they gave. The team’s four machine-learning algorithms ranged in accuracy from 77.5% to 85%. But when the researchers included features of the mouse paths—such as deviation from a straight line—in their training materials, computers were able to successfully pick out the liars 90% to 95% of the time, the researchers reported last month in PLOS ONE.They also trained and tested the algorithms using only questions that the liars answered truthfully, such as whether they were Italian. The algorithms could still identify the fibbers with 77.5% to 80% accuracy. Jumping back and forth between telling the truth and lying seems to have a broad effect on people’s behavior, the scientists say. Having to tell a lie changes the way people tell the truth.But would such a method work in the real world? Giuseppe Sartori, a forensic neuroscientist at the University of Padua in Italy and an author of the paper, says it could be used as a “first screen” to check people’s alibis in criminal investigations, verify identities online, or even cull terrorists from refugees at border checkpoints. It likely won’t have the same accuracy it does in the lab, but he calls the study a good “proof of concept.”“It’s a clever idea,” says Giorgio Ganis, a cognitive neuroscientist at Plymouth University in the United Kingdom. “But it’s not obvious that it’s going to be super useful.” Ganis notes that in the real world, fraudsters would likely spend more time researching their backstories, making surprising questions harder to find. “You’re going to catch the dumb criminals and dumb terrorists,” he says, “which is better than nothing, I guess.” Sartori adds that even though impostors might learn their purported zodiac sign, other unexpected questions are practically unlimited. Do they know the cross streets of their purported home address? Do they know the layout of the restaurant where they say they were on the night of a crime? The study brings a whole new meaning to the game of cat and mouse. Emaillast_img read more

Watch a lightweight glove allow users to feel objects in virtual reality

Watch a lightweight glove allow users to feel objects in virtual reality

first_img Virtual reality (VR) seems so lifelike—until you try to reach out and touch something. Now, researchers have solved this tactile problem—with a new kind of glove that allows wearers to actually feel objects in their artificial environments without clunky machines weighing down their arms.Existing VR gloves mostly allow the users to feel the texture of an object using vibrations. They don’t sense shape, or they require heavy motors or air compressors to put pressure on the users’ hands to do so. In the new study, researchers wanted to make a light, nonrestrictive glove with an open palm that felt natural to wear, while providing realistic feedback when the user touched a virtual object.To create the glove, they outfitted a piece of soft silicone with sensors that detect hand motions and actuators—small silicone bubbles coupled with electrodes to generate an electric force—that provide physical feedback to the user’s fingertips. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Watch a lightweight glove allow users to ‘feel’ objects in virtual reality Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img By Eva FrederickJul. 18, 2019 , 12:05 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A team member wore the glove to interact with a virtual chess board. When the virtual hand touched a piece, software prompted the glove to produce electricity, which caused the center part of the glove’s fingertips to fill with air, giving a sense of the object’s shape, the team reports today in Scientific Reports.The entire device, including the battery and circuit attached to a strap around the user’s wrist, weighs about one-sixth of a kilogram, about the same as a medium-size apple. The researchers suggest the glove—just a prototype for now—could be linked with different VR software to let users easily pick up objects in games or feel realistic sensation when they press a button or pull a lever in a training simulation.last_img read more

Nipsey Hussles Family Battle For Custody Of Daughter

Nipsey Hussles Family Battle For Custody Of Daughter

first_imgThe suspect was killed Hussle is 29-year-old Eric Holder, was arrested on April 2. He has been charged with one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of possession of a firearm by a felon.They reportedly did not know each other and it was not a gang-related shooting. While Hussle was associated with gangs, he appeared to be distancing himself from that life. Shortly before his death, he was talking with Steve Soboroff, president of the Los Angeles Police Commission, about how to avoid youth from getting involved in gangs.Rest in power, Nipsey Hussle.SEE ALSO:Erykah Badu Demands An Apology From ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ Producer Dream HamptonOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes As of now, the judge has ruled for Emani to stay with the sister but there is another hearing scheduled for July. Outside of the courtroom, she said she was “pissed off” but didn’t say much else to the TMZ cameras. See below:Yesterday, it was reported that Foster has a bench warrant issued for missing a court date for the case on May 15, therefore, her probation was revoked. She is on probation for a DUI back in 2016, according to TMZ.The site also claims, “In 2007 she was busted for vandalism, annoying phone calls and disturbing the peace. Those charges were eventually dismissed after she completed her probation. In 2006, she was arrested for resisting arrest and disturbing the peace.Hussle’s family might be the most stable place for the child. Although The Marathon Clothing store closed its doors, it’s still fully operational online. There are unconfirmed reports that Marathon Clothing has made $10 million since the rapper’s untimely death. If that was true, coupled with Nipsey Hussle’s estimated net worth of $8 million, his multiple investments that included buying a strip mall, have his family set up for life. US-ENTERTAINMENT-TELEVISION-COSBY-COURT Bill Cosby Gets Sentenced For His Sexual Assault Conviction More By NewsOne Staff Nipsey Hussle was killed on March 31 outside of his Marathon Clothing store. The rapper had 2-year-old Kross Asghedom with Lauren London and 10-year-old girl Emani Asghedom with Tanisha Foster. Since his death, Foster has been in a custody war with Nipsey’s sister Samantha.See Also: Never Forget: 39 Unforgettable Images Of People Protesting The Killing Of Michael BrownAccording to TMZ, Hussle’s family reportedly believes Tanisha is an unfit mother. Samantha claims she has always helped to raise Emani. She also wrote in a petition that the child should stay with her to “ensure the continued stability for Emani.” Samantha is requesting to be the legal guardian of Emani. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist Emani Asghedom , nipsey hussle , Tanisha Foster A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Nipsey Hussles Alleged Killer Reveals Motive

Nipsey Hussles Alleged Killer Reveals Motive

first_img#BREAKING: The suspect in the shooting death of musician Nipsey Hussle has been captured in Bellflower, authorities say. pic.twitter.com/5P9ItJM3kH— CBS Los Angeles (@CBSLA) April 2, 2019 Eric Holder , Hip Hop , Los Angeles , nipsey hussle SUBSCRIBE Bill Cosby Gets Sentenced For His Sexual Assault Conviction According to testimony from witness Herman Douglas, Hussle allegedly said, “Man, you know, they got some paperwork on you.”Douglas also testified, “Nipsey was more or less trying to, trying to look out for the dude, was trying to help him. Like basically warning the dude, like, you know, ‘They got some paperwork on you. I haven’t read the paperwork, but you know, you got to watch your back.’”Holder reportedly got frustrated, asked Nipsey if he ever snitched. Hussle “calmly waved Holder off” according to a woman who was with the alleged killer. Holder left but came back soon after and killed the rapper.The New York Daily News reports, “The woman said she and Holder later drove off, and that’s when Holder pulled out a gun and demanded she drive to a certain location nearby and wait for him. She said he got out without explaining himself and then jumped back in the vehicle a short time later. The woman said she was confused, but Holder threatened to slap her if she didn’t drive away.”Two days after the shooting, the woman turned herself in and sat down for a five-hour interview.Holder was a failed rapper whose street name was Shitty Cuz. The 29-year-old was arrested on April 2. He was found in Bellflower, California, which is located in southeast Los Angeles.He has been charged with one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of possession of a firearm by a felon. He is facing life in prison. Entertainment, News and Lifestyle for Black America. News told by us for us. Black America’s #1 News Source: Our News. Our Voice. More By NewsOne Staff Thanks for signing up! Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Get ready for Exclusive content, Interviews,and Breaking news delivered direct to your inbox. Hip-hop is still mourning the loss of 34-year-old Nipsey Hussle who was fatally shot on March 31 outside of his Marathon Clothing store. Now, the alleged killer, 29-year-old Eric Holder, has revealed a motive, according to court docs. US-ENTERTAINMENT-TELEVISION-COSBY-COURT Rest in power, Nipsey Hussle.SEE ALSO:Erykah Badu Demands An Apology From ‘Surviving R. Kelly’ Producer Dream HamptonOutrageous! Figurines Of White Cherub Crushing Head Of Black Angel Removed From Dollar StoreMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes See Also: Never Forget: 39 Unforgettable Images Of People Protesting The Killing Of Michael BrownAccording to grand jury transcript that have just been released, Holder was upset over snitching accusations. The New York Daily News reports, Deputy District Attorney John McKinney said, “Mr. Holder got out of the car, immediately walked up to the group where Mr. Hussle, or Mr. Asghedom was, and they had a conversation. That conversation is important because that conversation had something to do with Mr. Asghedom accusing Mr. Holder of snitching, which in the gang world is a very serious offense.” Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racist A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Familylast_img read more

Humans—like other animals—may sense Earths magnetic field

Humans—like other animals—may sense Earths magnetic field

first_img By Kelly ServickMar. 18, 2019 , 1:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Biophysicist Joe Kirschvink and his team used brain recordings to search for a magnetic sixth sense in people. Spencer Lowell A study published today offers some of the best evidence yet that humans, like many other creatures, can sense Earth’s magnetic field. But it doesn’t settle other questions that have swirled around this contentious idea for decades: If we do have a subconscious magnetic sense, does it affect our behavior? And does it arise from an iron mineral found in our brains, as the authors believe?“I think this paper will make quite a splash,” says Peter Hore, a physical chemist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. But, he adds, “Independent replication is crucial.”A variety of species—bacteria, snails, frogs, lobsters—seem to detect Earth’s magnetic field, and some animals, such as migratory birds, rely on it for navigation. But testing for the sense in humans has been tricky. Experiments in the 1970s that asked blindfolded participants to point in a cardinal direction after being spun around or led far from home yielded inconsistent results.center_img Email Humans—like other animals—may sense Earth’s magnetic field Biophysicist Joe Kirschvink at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena is a veteran of the search. Using electroencephalography (EEG), his team recorded brain activity from electrodes on the scalp to search for some response to changes in a highly controlled magnetic field equal in strength to Earth’s.In the experiment, each of the 34 participants sat quietly in a dark aluminum box that shielded them from electromagnetic noise such as radio waves. By changing the flow of electric current through coils lining the box, the researchers created a magnetic field that sloped steeply downward, like Earth’s own field at the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Then they rotated the field, as would happen if a person turned their head.In an EEG study with a different design, published in 2002, other researchers failed to find any brain response to a changing field. Kirschvink says data analysis techniques used at the time were not powerful enough to detect an effect. The new study, published in eNeuro, found that the rotating field sometimes elicited a marked drop in waves of the α frequency, which are typical of a brain that is awake but at rest. Many EEG studies use α to track responses to visual information, says Mary MacLean, a neuroscientist at the University of California (UC), Santa Barbara, who was not involved in the work. A change in α, she says, “is generally a good indicator of the degree to which people are engaging in sensory processing.”The effect showed up in less than a third of participants, which could indicate that genetic factors or past experiences influence a person’s sensitivity to a magnetic field, says cognitive neuroscientist Shinsuke Shimojo, another member of the Caltech team. Mysteriously, the change registered only when the field was rotated counterclockwise.“What they show is very exciting and seems robust,” says Stuart Gilder, a geophysicist at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany. But the results call for follow-up tests, such as measuring how different field strengths and rotation speeds affect brain activity, he adds.“I’m not surprised there’s an effect,” says Margaret Ahmad, a biologist at Sorbonne University in Paris, who notes that magnetic fields are known to affect human and other mammalian cells in a dish. “There’s something in a cell that is different in the presence of a magnetic field,” she says. “We see this effect in human embryonic kidney cells; you’re not going to convince me that an effect in brain cells is of any greater or lesser significance.”The Caltech team is still far from explaining how magnetoreception is possible, scientists say. “I’m convinced that something in the brain is responding to a magnetic field in a particular way,” Maclean says. “I just have no idea … what mechanism that really represents.”The mechanism of magnetoreception is only settled for certain bacteria, which harbor magnetite crystals that align with Earth’s magnetic field. Bird beaks and fish snouts also contain magnetite, as does the human brain. Gilder and his colleagues recently found that it is most concentrated in lower, evolutionarily ancient regions—the brain stem and cerebellum. But no one has identified the proposed sensory cells that contain magnetite.Other groups suggest a protein in the retina called cryptochrome, which senses incoming light, also responds to magnetic fields. But Kirschvink’s team contends its new results tip the scales in favor of magnetite. When they reversed their magnetic field to point upward, its rotations no longer elicited a change in brain activity. Magnetite, like a compass needle, responds to a field’s direction, whereas cryptochrome would respond identically to fields with opposite polarity.“If the results are real, I think that rules out cryptochrome as the source of these effects in humans,” Hore says, though it might play a role in other animals.But is a change in brain waves alone evidence of a “sense”? Some aren’t convinced. “If I were to … stick my head in a microwave and switch it on, I would see effects on my brain waves,” says Thorsten Ritz, a biophysicist at UC Irvine. “That doesn’t mean we have a microwave sense.”More convincing would be evidence that the brain actually processes magnetic information in a way that influences behavior, Ritz says. He is intrigued by a study from a South Korean research team, published last month in PLOS ONE, which found that, in the absence of visual or auditory cues, men who had fasted for about 20 hours could sometimes orient themselves in a direction they previously associated with food.Kirschvink’s team has experiments in progress that aim to unearth subtle consequences of a magnetic sense—for example, manipulating the magnetic field to bias a person’s best guess at a cardinal direction. “That would really supersolidly establish that humans have a full-fledged magnetosensory system,” says Caltech neuroscience graduate student Connie Wang, who is first author on the new paper. The team also wants to test whether careful training could bring magnetic sensations into consciousness.If humans really use a magnetite-based sensor, there are other concerns to explore, Kirschvink says, such as whether the magnets in aviation headsets could impair pilots’ sense of direction, and whether the strong magnetic field generated by MRI machines could somehow alter our magnetite.Three years ago, Kirschvink gave a preview of these results at a meeting of the United Kingdom’s Royal Institute of Navigation, which meets every 3 years in Egham. On 12 April, at the society’s next meeting, he’ll take the stage to defend his ideas to an audience of skeptics, with data in hand. “We’re going to have a fun session,” he says. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

The Psychedelic Revolution of the Beatles

The Psychedelic Revolution of the Beatles

first_imgIn 1963, the official “Beatlemania” took hold and all of a sudden, four unknown guys from Liverpool became international pop stars, filling up stadiums and rocking the media with their liberal opinions on long hair, while opening a new surge of British bands into the vast American market. Even though the band’s success was growing with each new release, in 1965 their audience experienced a significant change in both their sound and their appearance.The Beatles wave to fans after arriving at Kennedy Airport.In December 1965, the Beatles released an album titled Rubber Soul, which was referred by Lennon as the band’s “pot album,” due to its more introspective lyrics and mesmerizing guitars, as well as reflecting the band’s use of cannabis.Having been introduced to the drug by Bob Dylan, the Beatles were becoming a true voice of the generation regarding issues such as the emerging hippie counterculture and the Vietnam War.Dylan performing in the Feyenoord Football Club Stadium, Rotterdam, June 23, 1978. Photo by Chris Hakkens CC BY-SA 2.0Even though Rubber Soul represented a significant step in the band’s development, it was not until one fateful night that their careers would take an unexpected turn.It was at a friendly dinner to which John Lennon and George Harrison were invited together with their then-spouses. The event was hosted by a respectable London dentist John Riley and his girlfriend, Cyndy Bury.John Lennon (left) and Paul McCartney (right) in 1964.After their meal, Riley insisted that the guests stay for a cup of coffee. Little did they know that the coffee was actually spiked with LSD ― a powerful hallucinogen which was becoming more and more popular among hippie youth, sworn to experiment with any mind-altering substance they could get their hands on.When Riley announced that they had ingested LSD, George, John and their wives, Patty and Cynthia, protested against his decision to slip them the drug without prior notice. What followed was an episode of LSD-induced paranoia, which would change the two Beatles forever.George Harrison in 1964. Photo by Nationaal Archief CC BY-SA 3.0Lennon later recalled the incident, describing a scene at Harrison’s Esher residence, just outside London:“God, it was just terrifying, but it was fantastic. George’s house seemed to be just like a big submarine… It seemed to float above his wall, which was 18 foot, and I was driving it. I did some drawings at the time, of four faces saying, ‘We all agree with you.’ I was pretty stoned for a month or two.”According to later interviews, George wasn’t far off from John’s point of view. The two agreed that they had to repeat the experience with the rest of the band, despite both having mixed feelings about the effects that the drug had on them.Harrison, McCartney, and Lennon with George Martin at EMI Studios in the mid-1960s.Now it was time to take their music one step further, and during the 1960s it apparently meant consuming a more powerful drug. What would result from this experiment was something that changed music history forever ― the Beatles’ seventh studio album, titled Revolver.However, the band wasn’t exactly unanimous in this decision. Ringo Starr agreed to partake, but Paul McCartney considered LSD too much of an influence:“It alters your life and you never think the same again. John was rather excited by that prospect. I was rather frightened by that prospect. . . never get back home again. I was seen to sort of stall. . . because there was a lot of peer pressure.”Swinging London, Carnaby Street, c. 1966. The album’s creation coincided with international recognition of London’s role as a cultural capital. According to Philip Norman, Revolver captured the confidence of summer 1966: “It was hot pavements, open windows, King’s Road bistros and England soccer stripes. It was the British accent, once again all-conquering.”Without McCartney aboard the Yellow Submarine, the band felt incomplete. It wasn’t until later on that the Beatles bass player and vocalist would try LSD, but even without experiencing it first hand, he quickly came to realize that transferring the effects of acid into music was an experiment worth making.McCartney was at the time the only Beatle who wasn’t married and living in the suburbs. He was an important part of London nightlife and the underground art scene, with his ear constantly on the ground, listening for what might be the next big thing.McCartney, Harrison, Swedish pop singer Lill-Babs, and Lennon on the set of the Swedish television show Drop-In, October 30, 1963.Therefore, the band’s fusion of newly-induced ideas such as Indian and Tibetan religious philosophies with McCartney’s influence by experimental composers of the likes of Karlheinz Stockhausen, Luciano Berio, and Edgard Varèse was bound to bring up surprising results and new techniques of recording once the group hit the studio at Abbey Road.George Martin, who was the band’s regular collaborator and the legendary producer behind Revolver was this time tasked with a slightly different approach. At one point, Lennon told Martin that he needed a sound of “thousands of monks chanting” for the album’s final track, “Tomorrow Never Knows”.Abbey Road Studios (formerly known as EMI Studios) is a recording studio located at 3 Abbey Road, St John’s Wood, City of Westminster, London, England.Of course, even for the almighty Beatles, the summoning of one thousand monks was out of the question, but the producer together with McCartney came up with a compromise that sounded even better. The track features Lennon’s vocals which were amplified through a rotating speaker, achieving a never-before-heard chilling effect.A number of other musical experiments were conducted on the record, and a number of them were refused as everyone agreed that they were just too crazy. For example, Lennon proposed at one point that he should sing while hanging from the ceiling of the studio.The group with disc jockey Jim Stagg during their U.S. tour in August 1966.Needless to say, not all of Lennon’s ideas made it into the final cut, but still, this was one of the most radical albums in terms of recording of its time.Harrison, on the other hand, added the mystical Indian vibe, by introducing traditional Indian instruments such as the tamboura and sitar into the recordings, creating an other-worldly experience they had strived for.McCartney, who was more interested in the technical aspect of the process, was inspired by Stockhausen’s experiments with early electronic music. One day he brought along a number of tape loops which he had prepared the night before. The loops included sounds of guitar tuning and various shrieks and unnerving sounds of unknown origin.The loops were then played forward and backward, eventually resulting in the rather unique soundscape that is the Revolver.Read another story from us: Michael Jackson and Paul McCartney’s Feud Over Beatles Song RightsA new chapter in music was opened, making way to bands such as The Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Quicksilver Messenger Service, the Doors, and Pink Floyd ― all of whom owe so much to the Beatles, who set the bar for making what was by then called Psychedelic music. Strangely enough, like many stories regarding historical moments, it all started around a dinner table.last_img read more

Apollo 11 Crew Went Through Customs And Declared Rocks

Apollo 11 Crew Went Through Customs And Declared Rocks

first_imgOn July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong made history as he became the first person to walk on the Moon. But there was a catch to it. Before they were celebrated and had to go for the unavoidable world tour, the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin were not spared and had to go through customs checks. As Nick Allen reported for the Telegraph, “Not even a successful moon mission could prevent the spacemen from the red tape.”Once they completed their historic moon landing mission, the Apollo 11 crew returned successfully to Earth on July 24, 1969, where they splashed down in the Pacific Ocean 920 miles (1,480 km) southwest of Hawaii and 13 miles (21 km) from the USS Hornet, a Navy ship sent to pick up the crew.Mission Operations Control Room at the conclusion of Apollo 11According to a customs form filed at the Honolulu airport in Hawaii on the said date (July 24, 1969), Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin like responsible travelers declared their cargo which included moon rocks, specks of moon dust and other lunar samples.In other parts of the form, they listed their flight route with Cape Kennedy (now Cape Canaveral) in Florida as the starting point with a stopover on the moon.Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin, the crew of the Apollo 11The filled customs form was last week posted at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website to mark the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.In celebrating the 40th anniversary, CNN reported Buzz Aldrin revealed he was reimbursed $33.31 for the “business trip” from Houston, Texas to the Moon. That would have amounted to $207 in our present day according to a report by the Telegraph.Customs and Immigration form signed by Apollo 11 astronauts after returning from the MoonIn an interview with SPACE.com, NASA spokesperson John Yembrick said that it took two more days for the astronauts to return to Hawaii on July 26th, where they were welcomed with a July 27th ceremony at Pearl Harbor.What’s more, the astronauts were isolated in a NASA trailer as part of a quarantine process just in case they came back contaminated with germs or other diseases from the moon. NASA website reported that the astronauts wore special suits when they exited the USS Hornet after they were picked up.Buzz Aldrin salutes the US flag on the Moon/ Apollo 11 Image LibraryThey were transported by NASA to Houston in a quarantine trailer where they were isolated for 21 days. According to The Guardian, the Apollo 11 crew had to account for their health.While none fell ill during this historic journey, their disease exposure status was listed on the customs form as “to be determined.” (These days, astronauts who return from space can immediately exit the aircraft, although astronauts who go on longer journeys to space undergo special medical checks due to months of weightlessness spent in space.)Columbia floats on the ocean as Navy divers assist in retrieving the astronautsAn interesting fact to note is that there would have been no need for the customs checks if the moon landing mission had not been successful, as then U.S president Richard Nixon had a speech prepared to call the wives of the astronauts if things went south.It read “Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace. These brave men know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for humanity in their sacrifice.”The crew of Apollo 11 in quarantine after returning to Earth, visited by Richard NixonThankfully the speech wasn’t given as the mission was successful and the Apollo 11 crew returned home safe and sound. That being said, astronauts no longer have to go through customs declarations once they return from space.Read another story from us: Apollo 11 Tapes Made Public – NASA Releases 19,000 Hours of Historic AudioA 1984 statute in the U.S. Federal Code (19 U.S. Code § 1484a) is titled “Articles returned from space not to be construed as importation.” It appears to be an amendment to the infamous Tariff Act of 1930, which is better known as the Smoot-Hawley Act.last_img read more

Sixteen more students receive Cuban scholarships

Sixteen more students receive Cuban scholarships

first_imgShareTweetSharePinThe students selected to go to Cuba with officialsThis year marks the 40th anniversary of the Cuban scholarship programme and another sixteen Dominican students have been awarded scholarships to pursue studies in Cuban Universities.Among the recipients, ten received scholarships for studies in medicine, three in engineering, two in higher education and one in nursing.They received their certificates of acceptance at a special handing over ceremony held at the Embassy of the Republic of Cuba in Morne Daniel on Monday, June 24th 2019.Architect and former Cuban scholarship recipient in 1981, Severin McKenzie said close to 400 students have received Cuban scholarships since Hurricane David in 1979.“At that time, the Cuban government’s position was [that] they could not give money as assistance to Dominica at that time like other countries were doing with relief but the type of relief they would give would be scholarships to the youth. And you can see that 40 years later, this appears to be the only tangible relief that has grown from 11 students in the first group to close to 400 today.”He said all the relief received from other countries has disappeared or forgotten but the Cuban scholarship programme ended up being something of real value.McKenzie also encouraged the recipients to return to Dominica to assist in the country’s development.“Many of us have actually stayed here because one of the things that we learnt from the Cuban experience is that we were actually going to Cuba to come back to Dominica to help develop the country,” he said. “We want you to remember it is a great sacrifice that the Cuban people are in fact educating you, giving you an education to personally develop yourselves, but most importantly to come back here and to help develop our beautiful land.”The Cuban Embassy has not only contributed to Dominica’s human resource development but also towards its infrastructural development and health sector.last_img read more

Woodruff Bridge restoration project contract is awarded

Woodruff Bridge restoration project contract is awarded

first_imgWoodruff Bridge restoration project contract is awarded By L. Parsons A contract to begin repair on the Woodruff Bridge was awarded to J. Banicki Construction of Phoenix during last week’s meeting of the Navajo County Board of Supervisors. “The contract includes repairSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad October 4, 2017last_img

PG medical student ends life in Nagpur

PG medical student ends life in Nagpur

first_img Top News By Express News Service |Nagpur | Published: July 5, 2019 8:35:28 pm LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Maharashtra Association of Resident Doctors Nagpur unit President Virendra Kadam said, “it is possible that he may have felt work stress since first year PG is generally stressful for all due to 24-hour duty but he hadn’t confided about it with anyone. If there was any personal reason behind his suicide, that will be known only in the inquiry. His parents and brother will be reaching later tonite. Maybe, they will have something to share.”IGGMC Dean Ajay Keoliaya said, “he had recently joined and may have felt work stress. The resident doctors have to be around for 24 hours. But all that will be known in the investigations.” Delhi teen suicide, teen suicide delhi, online shopping, delhi police, delhi news IGGMC Dean Ajay Keoliaya said, “He had recently joined and may have felt work stress. The resident doctors have to be around for 24 hours. But all that will be known in the investigations.” (Representational Image)A POST-GRADUATE student and resident doctor at the Indira Gandhi Government Medical College (IGGMC) here committed suicide by hanging himself in his hostel room on Friday morning. Advertising Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Advertising Manyukumar Vaidya, hailing from Byadagi village in Dharwad district of Karnataka, had got admission to Gynaecology Department and had joined the college on May 2.Reason for suicide is not known since no suicide note found anywhere. “He had only sent a message to his brother on mobile phone that he was going to end his life,” said Police Inspector Ajay Malviya of Tahsil police station.Vaidya was said to be a sensitive person and also composed poetry, his Facebook page reveals. Fellow students said he had a lot of problem in communicating with patients since he didn’t know Marathi or Hindi and he would often cite that as cause of stress. They also said long hours of duty were also causing stress to him. Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

These undeciphered symbols date back to Roman times

These undeciphered symbols date back to Roman times

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country These undeciphered symbols date back to Roman times Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe What’s in a name? For the ancient Picts—a federation of Celtic-speaking tribes that lived in modern-day Scotland—the answer might go something like “salmon-beast” or “fish-flower.” Those are just two combinations of some 30 mysterious symbols that this society of farmers, who lived between the third and 10th centuries C.E., carved into hundreds of freestanding stone monuments and bone tools. But the symbols have not been deciphered, and their meaning has perplexed researchers for centuries. Now, archaeologists may have gotten one step closer by figuring out when the earliest symbols appeared.Because most Pictish symbols are carved in stone, they can’t be dated using traditional methods that rely on the decay rate of organic materials. Instead, archaeologists have relied on imprecise rules of thumb that suggest symbols incised on unshaped stones in this part of the world usually date to about the fifth century C.E. But that evidence is highly circumstantial and not considered as accurate as direct dating.In the early 19th century, a group of children discovered carvings in a wall that belonged to Dunnicaer, a Pictish fort site on Scotland’s eastern coast. In recent archaeological excavations of the site, diggers also found traces of organic material—several slivers of preserved timber and a piece of charcoal in an ancient hearth. Scientists radiocarbon dated these objects, and more timber from a site farther inland, to about 200 C.E. to 300 C.E. They also dated an ox bone and a bone pin from a Pictish site on the Orkney Islands (pictured above) to about 400 C.E. Taken together, the findings suggest the Pictish symbols date to at least the early third century, they report today in Antiquity. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Gordon Noble et al., Antiquity 10.15184 (2018)/Roderick Richmond for Orkney, Arts, Museums & Heritage That means the symbols are nearly 200 years older than previously thought. The new time frame also lines up with the spread of Roman writing systems through the region, suggesting the Picts’ enemies may have partially inspired their script. Although the Picts didn’t adopt the Roman alphabet, they may have picked up the idea of using symbols to represent significant names and places, the authors argue. That makes sense, they say, given that at least some of the stone monuments appear to mark important sites—and their rulers. By Michael PriceOct. 26, 2018 , 7:00 AMlast_img read more

Call of Duty WWII Kicks Off Holiday Season With a Bang

Call of Duty WWII Kicks Off Holiday Season With a Bang

first_imgCall of Duty WWII is likely to be the top-selling game in the U.S. during the fourth quarter, with packaged retail sales growth running 25 percent above 2016 release Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, said NPD Group analyst Mat Piscatella. Digital sales likely will top year-ago sales of the previous title.”Call of Duty has been a market mover for years, and I expect CoD WWII to be no different,” he told TechNewsWorld.Although the new title probably will not surpass overall sales of some other CoD titles, it’s likely to reinvigorate the brand considerably, Piscatella said.The new Call of Duty will do slightly better than last year’s Call of Duty title, predicted Steve Bailey, an analyst at IHS Markit.However, any uptick in sales will be tempered by the sheer level of competition in the marketplace from both a shooter and online-multiplayer perspective, he told TechNewsWorld.”Moreover, the commercial landscape is now so complex and continuous that initial sales figures are becoming a less valuable indicator of long-term success,” Bailey added.As time moves on, the game’s fit as an e-sports title and the title’s ability to monetize existing users without discouraging them will be closely watched in the modern, service-driven marketplace.”I think the hype is largely driven by the anticipation of change,” said Karol Severin, analyst at Midia Research.”More concretely, it’s about going back to the old days and further improving on experiences that made the franchise in the first place, while utilizing new social aspects and capabilities,” he told TechNewsWorld.Call of Duty achieves this in a couple of ways, Severin explained. First, it goes back to the World War II setting. Second, it adds the new War mode, allowing players to work together through a series of mini objectives to complete a wider mission, which is similar to the single player experiences in the original Call of Duty and Call of Duty 2.This time around, the game is geared toward the multiplayer experience, and promises to improve it through the Headquarters hub, which provides better interaction by showing off players’ trophies and allowing competition in various disciplines, noted Severin.All of these changes and other improvements to the game experience, he said, will re-engage players who haven’t bought a new CoD in a while, while retaining hard-core fans. Driving Holiday Sales The latest installment provides a new level of excitement with several key features added to the multiplayer experience.”Our teams at Sledgehammer and Raven not only captured the epic scale and authentic atmosphere of the most brutal war ever fought, they also brought a hell of a lot of innovations,Activision CEO Eric Hirshberg said. “From a whole new way to play multiplayer with War Mode, to a new social space with Headquarters, to a jump-out-of-your-chair scary Nazi Zombies mode.” Call of Duty WWII already has energized the multiplayer community, as the Call of Duty World League has more than US$4.2 million in prize money, the largest pot of gold since Call of Duty entered e-sports competitions.The title is available on a multitude of platforms, including PlayStation 4, Xbox One X and Xbox One, as well as Steam for PC players. The base edition and digital base edition retail for $59.99 each, while the Digital Deluxe Edition-Season Pass and the Pro Edition-Season Pass retail for $99.99.Electronics superstore Best Buy opened about 600 stores around the country at midnight Eastern Time (9 p.m. on the West coast) in order to let customers experience the new title as soon as possible, according to spokesperson Shane Kitzman.The store does not comment on sales figures, he said.Activision confirmed that servers went down briefly, interrupting game play for early online customers. Activision’s Call of Duty WWII became available on Friday, and the title made its long-awaited debut with a splash, kicking off what is expected to be a robust holiday season for the gaming industry.The most anticipated multiplatform title of the season, based on the Nielsen Game Rank, Call of Duty WWII latest installment reaches back to the iconic gaming franchise’s origins. It offers fans an immersive and educational experience, creating a true-to-life simulation of America’s 1st Infantry Division storming the beaches of Normandy alongside British and other allied forces to liberate France from the Nazi regime. Competitive Atmosphere David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times.last_img read more

Physical therapy can effectively treat infants with congenital muscular torticollis

Physical therapy can effectively treat infants with congenital muscular torticollis

first_img Source:http://home.lww.com/news.entry.html/2018/10/03/physical_therapyis-Gt0R.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 3 2018Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a common postural deformity in infants, and one that can be effectively treated by physical therapy. A set of updated, evidence-based recommendations for physical therapy management of CMT is presented in the October issue of Pediatric Physical Therapy. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.Reflecting the latest research relevant to the prevention, screening, and intervention of CMT, the 2018 update emphasizes the importance of early identification and referral for physical therapy. “Early intervention for infants with CMT, initiated before three to four months of age, results in excellent outcomes,” according to the updated clinical practice guideline. The authors are Sandra L. Kaplan, PT, DPT, PhD, of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark; Colleen Coulter, PT, DPT, PhD, PCS, of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta; and Barbara Sargent, PT, PhD, PCS, of University of Southern California, Los Angeles.Latest Evidence to Guide Physical Therapy for Infants with CMTCongenital muscular torticollis – sometimes called “twisted neck” or “wryneck” – is a postural deformity evident shortly after birth. Typically, affected infants tend to position their head tilted to one side and turned to the opposite side. The changes are due to shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, a long muscle running from the collar bone to the base of the skull behind the ear. The reported incidence of CMT ranges from 4 to 16 percent?of newborns.The 2018 clinical practice guideline for physical therapy management of CMT reflects new research since the previous guidelines, published in 2013. The update includes 17 “action statements,” supported by current research evidence, reviewed by expert practitioners, pediatricians, parents, and other stakeholders. Highlights of the new and updated action statements include: Education for all expectant parents and parents of newborns. Parents and caregivers should be taught about the importance of tummy time when the infant is awake to promote strong neck and trunk muscles and positioning to prevent postural preferences. Assessment of all infants for CMT and other asymmetries, performed by all healthcare professionals who care for newborns and infants. The guidelines recommend screening all infants for CMT from birth through six months. Prompt referral to a physician and physical therapist with experience in treating infants, as soon as CMT or asymmetry is noticed. Evidence shows that starting physical therapy earlier shortens the time to achieve normal neck motion while reducing the need for surgery. Physical therapy examination and evaluation, including a revised classification system for CMT severity. Physical therapy intervention with the goal of improving neck range of motion, strength, and postural alignment. The guidelines state: “Early intervention for infants with CMT, initiated before three to four months of age, results in excellent outcomes with 92 to 100 percent achieving full passive neck rotation and zero to one percent requiring surgical intervention.” Follow-up evaluation, including criteria for successful completion of physical therapy. The guidelines also address when to obtain specialist consultation for infants who are not progressing as expected.center_img For each recommendation, the strength of the supporting evidence is summarized and priorities for future research are discussed. The guidelines also include flow charts to guide early identification and referral to physical therapy for infants with CMT as well as for classification of CMT severity. The authors comment: “Our 2018 update of the CMT clinical practice guideline is intended as a reference document to guide physical therapists, families, health care professionals, and educators to improve clinical outcomes and health services for children with CMT, and to inform future research.”last_img read more

Nintendo Drops New Portable on Market as Switch Sales Take Hold

Nintendo Drops New Portable on Market as Switch Sales Take Hold

first_imgThe success of handheld gaming devices is due in part due to the drain gaming places on mobile devices, observed Rob Enderle, principal analyst at the Enderle Group.”Mobile is a big element, but playing games on your smartphone can draw down the battery, making it harder to receive calls,” he told TechNewsWorld. Gaming “drives smartphone replacements, which are expensive.” Nintendo announced the new 2DS XL just hours after it released earnings for the fiscal year ended March 31, which included early returns and an outlook on sales of its Nintendo Switch console, which made its long-awaited global debut on March 3.Sales of the Nintendo Switch got off to a promising start, the company said, with 2.74 million units sold through the end of March. Sales of the related software, including The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and 1-2 Switch totaled 5.46 million units.Sales of Nintendo 3DS software grew strongly during the period, according to Nintendo, with Pokemon Sun and Pokemon Moon recording 15.44 million unit sales since their November release. Super Mario Maker for Nintendo 3DS sold 2.34 million units, and Kirby: Planet Robobot sold 1.36 million units.Worldwide sales of 3DS hardware totaled 7.27 million units, an increase of 7 percent year-over-year, while sales of Nintendo 3DS software totaled 55.08 million units, an increase of 14 percent, year-over-year.For the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018, the company forecast sales of 10 million units of Nintendo Switch hardware, 35 million units of software, 6 million units of Nintendo 3DS hardware, 40 million units of 3DS software and 3 million units of Wii U software. The software forecasts do not include units bundled with hardware. Deep Cover David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. A spate of rumors preceded Nintendo’s launch of the new device, but they were scant on specifics, and in many cases the speculation was wrong.Lewis Ward, research director for gaming and VR/AR at IDC, said he had forecast that Nintendo would put out a new model, but admitted that he missed the price point and the rationale.”I posited that it would have deep Switch crossover, and that would help it sell more,” he told TechNewsWorld. “I was wrong in that this wasn’t a variation on 3DS that had new or different integration points, but I was right that it was due out.Ted Pollak, senior analyst for the game industry at Jon Peddie Research, said that he had expected a new device, but had no idea what was in the works.The New Nintendo 2DS XL makes a lot of sense from a user experience perspective, he told TechNewsWorld.”Handheld devices with buttons blow away the experience of touch/tilt phone gaming, which drains your battery and ties up your social apps and communications,” Pollak noted.Although he prefers the 3D screen over the 2D, the advantages sometimes are lost if the software is not developed specifically for the 3D, he pointed out.The 2D is enough for many users, Pollak said. It has a large screen, is less expensive, and it provides a larger user base to third-party developers. The 2DS XL has the same large screen as the 3DS XL and can play all the games made for the Nintendo 3DS, New Nintendo 3DS and Nintendo DS; however, it will display them in 2D. The device is smaller than the 3DS XL, but it has the same amount of power and provides built-in NFC support for amiibo cards as well as figures.”This new addition to Nintendo’s portable hardware line demonstrates our commitment to the handheld market,” said Reggie Fils-Aime, president of Nintendo of America. “New Nintendo 2DS XL sports a beautiful clamshell design and offers a great balance between price and performance.”Two new games for the 3DS family — Hey! PIKMIN and Miitopia — are set to launch on the same day as the 2DS XL release, the company said. Portable vs. Phone Switch Success Nintendo last week introduced a new contender in the increasingly hot portable gaming competition. The New Nintendo 2DS XL will make its debut on July 28 at a mid-range price of US$149.99.It will slot in as the company’s third portable gaming system, right between its entry-level 2DS and more robust 3DS XL.last_img read more

Study demonstrates benefits of using triple dual therapies in patients with COPD

Study demonstrates benefits of using triple dual therapies in patients with COPD

first_img Source:http://www.chestnet.org/News/Press-Releases/2018/10/Triple Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 5 2018The InforMing the PAthway of COPD Treatment (IMPACT) study was conducted to assess the benefits of triple versus dual therapy in patients with COPD. In a study at CHEST, researchers found that regardless of baseline reversibility, the usage of triple dual therapies significantly reduced the annual rate and moderate-to-severe and severe exacerbations, improved lung function and overall quality of life in patients.Related StoriesSmarter, more educated people get a cognitive ‘head start’, but aren’t protected from Alzheimer’sResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysThe randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, global study was conducted in 10,355 symptomatic patients with COPD with a history of moderate-to-severe exacerbations over a 52-week period. During the screening, patient was defined as reversible through differences shown between their pre- and post-albuterol assessments of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of ≥12 percent and ≥200 mL. Researchers also assessed the effect of baseline reversibility on treatment response with fluticasone furoate (FF)/umeclidinium (UMEC)/vilanterol (VI) and with FF/VI and UMEC/VI. The lung function and quality of life (QoL) of patients were measured by St George Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) and observed for FF/UMEC/VI over UMEC/VI independent of reversibility status at screening.During screening, 18 percent of patients demonstrated reversibility. In both reversible and nonreversible patients, there was a statistically significant reduction in the rate of moderate and severe exacerbations with FF/UMEC/VI as compared to UMEC/VI. They also found a reduction in the risk of having a moderate/severe exacerbation and the risk of having a severe exacerbation in both groups of patients. Quality of life was also improved in both reversible and non-reversible patients.last_img read more

Study highlights sex differences in thermal behavior

Study highlights sex differences in thermal behavior

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 10 2018New research from the University at Buffalo has, for the first time, identified differences between men and women in their preferences for maintaining comfort both while exercising and in recovery. The results could one day inform the development of new athletic apparel.The human body has a variety of automatic mechanisms in place to respond to being too warm, including sweating and increased skin blood flow. But people also have voluntary ways of cooling themselves down. If you’re in a stuffy room, for example, you can remove your jacket.Scientists refer to these voluntary actions as “thermal behavior.””This study is the first to highlight sex differences in thermal behavior,” said Nicole Vargas, a postdoctoral fellow in exercise and nutrition sciences in UB’s School of Public Health and Health Professions.Vargas is the lead author on the study, published online in August ahead of a scheduled December print date in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine.The study took place in UB’s Center for Research and Education in Special Environments. Researchers had 10 men and 10 women in their early 20s exercise at low intensity — about 65 revolutions per minute — on a stationary bicycle for one hour while watching a nature documentary. Each participant was equipped with a custom-made device: a dual tubing system that was in direct contact with the back of their neck.The basic model for this study harkened back to similar studies in thermal behavior done in the 1970s. Those, however, used the hand for cooling purposes. “The neck makes more sense, however, because it’s more sensitive perceptually, so it gave us a more sensitive measure of thermal behavior,” explained Zachary Schlader, the study’s senior author and an assistant professor of exercise and nutrition sciences at UB.One set of tubing was perfused with 93.2 degrees Fahrenheit water. The other series of tubes contained -4 degree liquid, but the flow of this liquid was controlled by a valve. Participants were instructed to “thermally behave” — or open the valve, thereby releasing the flow of extremely cold liquid — any time they felt that their neck was uncomfortably warm while exercising.”As soon as they felt thermally comfortable again, they would turn the valve off and the 93 degree water would come through again, which effectively warmed their neck to thermoneutral range. If they felt they were getting too warm again, they could turn that valve back on,” Vargas said.Related StoriesSupervised fun, exercise both improve psychosocial health of children with obesityLiver fat biomarker levels linked with metabolic health benefits of exercise, study findsIt’s never too late to take up exercise, advise researchersParticipants were monitored for one hour after exercising and were instructed during the recovery phase to maintain their neck temperature at a comfortable level.Researchers found that the female participants wanted more cooling than the males — despite similar overall changes in body temperature — as evidenced by the females’ more frequent use of the antifreeze liquid while exercising. Vargas says there are several potential explanations: Women have more subcutaneous fat than men, and women tend to have greater perceptual responses to temperature changes.”The really interesting thing we found was during recovery,” Vargas said. “The dynamic of how skin temperature recovers versus core temperature in females compared to males was a lot different.”Whereas skin temperature in males gradually fell following exercise, returning to normal levels within 60 minutes, skin temperature fell more rapidly in females, returning to normal levels within 10 minutes following exercise.This rapid fall in skin temperature should theoretically decrease the desire for neck cooling in females. However, the women in the study continued to thermally behave by releasing the flow of the extremely cold liquid, likely because their core temperature remained elevated. This highlighted the importance of core temperature as a major contributor to thermal behavior following exercise, which was more apparent in females.While the research team isn’t involved on the product side, the results of this study may help inform the development of new athletic apparel in the years to come.Since this study was completed, researchers have begun applying the basic study model and technique to more clinical applications. For example, Vargas received a grant through the American College of Sports Medicine to examine thermal behavior in people with multiple sclerosis. The symptoms of MS can be exacerbated during exercise.”We’re interested in determining whether people with MS use thermal behavior appropriately and if that can help mitigate some of the symptoms they feel while exercising,” Vargas explains. “This whole line of thermal behavior research has opened up a lot of doors for us.” Source:http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2018/10/018.htmllast_img read more

Researchers integrate several technologies to design new digital stethoscope

Researchers integrate several technologies to design new digital stethoscope

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 26 2018Researchers developed a new digital stethoscope that combines precision sensors, electrocardiogram technology and machine learning applications into one piece of equipment to better detect heart ailments and problems that might occur with an implanted heart pump.Jason Kolodziej and Steven Day, engineering professors at Rochester Institute of Technology, worked with Dr. Karl Schwarz, cardiologist and professor of medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center, to develop an Advanced Digital Stethoscope prototype. The researchers expanded capabilities and functions of a traditional stethoscope to detect off-rhythms of the heart, primarily one with an embedded left ventricular assist device, or heart pump.Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) are used to help manage end-stage heart failure, pumping blood from the left ventricle to the aorta to provide needed blood flow for patients with severely reduced heart function. The research team determined that natural heart sounds and the sounds of the implanted LVAD may hold the key to diagnosing patients with suspected device dysfunction.”This stethoscope that we designed integrates multiple sensors into one. It is not necessarily a new sensor that measures something never measured before; it is something that in a hospital setting would be done by multiple machines. Most cardiologists aren’t wheeling around this data collection hardware,” said Kolodziej, associate professor of mechanical engineering in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering.Cardiovascular disease is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. with more than 600,000 dying of heart disease annually, according to the Center for Disease Control. Diagnosis of the disease entails performing several important tests and assessments including ECG, echocardiograms, x-rays and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, for example. Acoustic information through a stethoscope is also one means to attain information about heart function.Stethoscope design has changed little since its invention in 1816 by Rene Laennec. Schwarz, director of the URMC’s Echocardiography Laboratory, performs routine imaging and advanced imaging studies on patients with complex cardiac disease and of patients with mechanical assist devices. The RIT and URMC researchers proposed modernizing a stethoscope design and worked to develop a prototype using innovative digital signal processing techniques, including digital signal filtering, advanced beat-based rejection algorithms and ensemble averaging.Related StoriesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockCutting around 300 calories a day protects the heart even in svelte adultsThe new design includes a microphone for recording data collected through the stethoscope, combined with ECG leads–stainless steel contact pads that would normally be affixed to a patient’s chest, arms and legs. Usually the ECG leads are part of a separate piece of equipment standard in acquiring digital audio of heart sounds. Instead, researchers attached them to the new stethoscope head. The new leads were 3D-printed at The Construct, an RIT laboratory.Apart from hardware for the project, computer algorithms–also referred to as machine learning techniques–are incorporated into the larger system to take in signals, and to learn and recognize defects. Techniques to improve acoustic diagnostics include spectral analysis, advanced automated neural networks and a combination of smartphone-based, interactive software that will allow the clinician to make a diagnosis when integrating the advanced acoustic analyses with other routine clinical information.Improvements to digital stethoscopes provide more information in the acoustic signature than is normally being used, and having been trained to listen for different things, physicians hear signals such as heart murmurs, valve regurgitation and other signals that indicate different defects, Day explained further.”It is almost unconscious, like people listening to engines, and hear something off that could mean a problem. But if you ask what sounds different, they may not be able to explain it or articulate it, but they just know. This is about getting the device to do that, to hear sounds and then to make that determination of what the problem could be,” said Day, a professor and head of RIT’s biomedical engineering program. He also has vast experience in the development of LVADs, building a state-of-the-art implantable blood pump with peers from the University of Virginia, the Utah Artificial Heart Institute and MedQuest Inc. Source:https://www.rit.edu/news/story.php?id=68280last_img read more

Cellular protein signal can be manipulated to favor bone building

Cellular protein signal can be manipulated to favor bone building

first_imgSuch a procedure requires a massive amount of new bone cells. If we could direct bone cell creation at the site of the fusion, we could help patients recover more quickly and reduce the risk of complications.”Aaron James The regenerative group of cells, known collectively as stem cells, all have the potential to develop into a variety of cell types including those that make up living tissues, such as bones. Scientists have long sought ways to manipulate the growth and developmental path of these cells, in either a living animal or the laboratory, to repair or replace tissue lost to disease or injury.Previous studies by others, James points out, showed that a particular type of stem cell — perivascular stem cells — had the ability to become either bone or fat and numerous studies since then have focused on advancing the understanding of what signaling proteins drive this developmental change.From past studies of his own, James also knew that the protein WISP-1 plays a key role in directing the stem cells.In his new experiments, James and his team genetically engineered stem cells collected from patients to block the production of the WISP-1 protein. Looking at gene activity in the cells without WISP-1, they found that four genes that cause fat formation were turned on 50-200 percent higher than control cells that contained normal levels of the WISP-1 protein.Related StoriesStudy: Megakaryocytes play an important role in cell migrationSingle-cell encapsulation technology can protect transplanted MSCs from immune attackComprehensive cell atlas of the human liverThe team then engineered human fat tissue stem cells to make more WISP-1 protein than normal, and found that three genes controlling bone formation became twice as active as in the control cells, and fat driving genes such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) decreased in activity in favor of “bone genes” by 42 percent.With this information in hand, the researchers next designed an experiment to test whether the WISP-1 protein could be used to improve bone healing in rats that underwent a type of spinal fusion — an operation frequently performed on people to alleviate pain or restore stability by connecting two of the vertebrae with a metal rod so that they grow into a single bone. An estimated 391,000 spinal fusions are performed in the U.S. each year, according to the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. A report on the experiments was published online Oct. 23 in the journal Scientific Reports. According to the Office of the Surgeon General,The researchers also plan to explore whether reducing the level of WISP-1 protein in stem cells could preferentially favor the development of fat cells for soft tissue wound healing as well. Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jan 7 2019If harnessed in people, it could speed recovery for bone breaks, spinal fusions, osteoporosisIn experiments in rats and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have added to evidence that a cellular protein signal that drives both bone and fat formation in selected stem cells can be manipulated to favor bone building. If harnessed in humans, they say, the protein — known as WISP-1 — could help fractures heal faster, speed surgical recovery and possibly prevent bone loss due to aging, injury and disorders. Source:https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/newsroom/news-releases/stem-cell-signal-drives-new-bone-buildingcenter_img In their experiments, the researchers mimicked the human surgical procedure in rats, but in addition, they injected — between the fused spinal bones — human stem cells with WISP-1 turned on.After four weeks, the researchers studied the rats’ spinal tissue and observed continued high levels of the WISP-1 protein. They also observed new bone forming, successfully fusing the vertebrae together, whereas the rats not treated with stem cells making WISP-1 did not show any successful bone fusion during the time the researchers were observing. Our bones have a limited pool of stem cells to draw from to create new bone. If we could coax these cells toward a bone cell fate and away from fat, it would be a great advancement in our ability to promote bone health and healing.”Aaron James, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pathology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and the study’s senior author We hope our findings will advance the development of cellular therapies to promote bone formation after surgeries like this one and for other skeletal injuries and diseases, such as broken bones and osteoporosis.” Aaron James Bone formation in the rat spine. Credit: Aaron James, Johns Hopkins Medicinelast_img read more